Essay on The Myth of the Student Loan Crisis

Published: 2021-06-29 04:16:54
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Politicians, commentators, journalist, and education researchers have thrown their bodies- and in turn, the nation- into a persistent state of panic about the coming higher education future with petrifying debates and articles that are spiraling on the student loan crisis. The higher education of America is absolutely a no disaster and no guarantee that It will by any means turn to be in the nearest foreseeable future. Among the many authors who has done write-ups that have elicited some eyebrows from all education, a stakeholder is Allan and Thompson. These two authors have done an article entitled "The Myth of the Student Loan Crisis" Panic is uncalled when addressing the undesirable state of higher education but by focusing on how effectively it can be helped and recognizing the strengths and significance it comprises should be advocated. The student loan crisis in higher education is just a myth and not a crisis as Allan and Thompson asserts. The student debt crisis is overblown, and college will always remain a good investment.

Body

Frist supporting sentence

The figures indicated that represent the cost of tuition are incomplete (topic sentence)

They had denoted that first timer, average tuition per student is $27453 and $15267 for two schools.

By indicating these figures, they are resonating college education cheap, and as a result, loans that student have are overhyped.

Nevertheless, an assessment that is honest will itemize down tuition costs according to a given institution.

Second supportive idea and sentences

Let's check on the assertion that the obligation of student loan is blown up (topic sentence).

They claim that "Horror stories of students drowning in $100,000+ debt might discourage young people from enrolling in college, but they are as rare as they are terrifying.

To some extent, this statement might be true but can be equated to a straw man.

The American higher education observers don't dwell on warning students on some debts; somewhat, they know the amount of loan obligation for an average student possess which is $27,000, besides this debts hinders many opportunities for young graduates, especially the unstable job market.

Third supporting idea and sentences

Indeed the author of the Myth of the Student Loan Crisis has to reassure all of us that "the economic value of collegeis indisputable" and that "as investments go, college is the best bet around (topic sentence)

They should be cognizant enough to give us the picture and sufficient figures that indicate college student contain earnings that are higher and that unemployment rates are lower in graduates of high school.

Without those sufficient data, then this statement does not hold true because they lack sufficient evidence that this claim.

Conclusion

Closing statement and restating the thesis states

Indeed the author of the Myth of the Student Loan Crisis has to reassure all of us that "the economic value of collegeis indisputable" and that "as investments go, college is the best bet around." They should be cognizant enough to give us the picture and sufficient figures that indicate college student contain earnings that are higher and that unemployment rates are lower in graduates of high school. I believe that higher education ought to benefit the larger society and individuals who cohabit in it. Everyone needs to shun away from shouting and diminishing the state which higher education is currently. I have proof that college education investment pays well despite the means one uses to acquire it. Am a believer that despite student debts being deemed as a crisis, we should appreciate that the same debt has led to the creation of a lot of opportunities after they graduate. Thus, the value of college education is economically indisputable. The student loan crisis in higher education is just a myth and not a crisis as Allan and Thompson asserts. The student debt crisis is overblown, and college will always remain a good investment.

Introduction

Politicians, commentators, journalist, and education researchers have thrown their bodies- and in turn, the nation- into a persistent state of panic about the coming higher education future with petrifying debates and articles that are spiraling on the student loan crisis. The higher education of America is absolutely a no disaster and no guarantee that It will by any means turn to be in the nearest foreseeable future. Among the many authors who has done write-ups that have elicited some eyebrows from all education, a stakeholder is Allan and Thompson. These two authors have done an article entitled "The Myth of the Student Loan Crisis" Panic is uncalled when addressing the undesirable state of higher education but by focusing on how effectively it can be helped and recognizing the strengths and significance it comprises should be advocated. The student loan crisis in higher education is just a myth and not a crisis as Allan and Thompson asserts. The student debt crisis is overblown, and college will always remain a good investment.

The figures indicated by Allan and Thompson that represent the cost of tuition are incomplete. They had denoted that first timer, average tuition per student is $27453 and $15267 for two schools (Nicole, and Thompson, 2013 p. 32). By indicating these figures, they are resonating college education cheap, and as a result, loans that student have are overhyped. Nevertheless, an assessment that is honest will itemize down tuition costs according to a given institution. Data from the National Center for Education indicate that a standard cost of university for a given student stands at $13,600 representing the public university and $36300 for the private and nonprofit institution. While that of profit universities and colleges stand at $25,500. As soon as we meditate concerning a debt of students in these types of higher institutions of learning, an image of student debts become a bit intricate than it is being framed by Atlantic addresses it. Divergent to their argument, the debt burden is heavier in cheaper schools. Cases of high rates of defaulting are significant in profit schools and private colleges than in private schools which are most expensive among all. For that reason, the college cost individually does not show us the very state of student debts. It is rather the financial background of students who attend these colleges that matter. Thus, it holds water that student who has high rates of defaulting in public and profit schools tend to be poorer compared to their peers in private institutions.

Let's check on the assertion that the obligation of student loan is blown up. They claim that "Horror stories of students drowning in $100,000+ debt might discourage young people from enrolling in college, but they are as rare as they are terrifying (Nicole, and Thompson, 2013 p. 32). To some extent, this statement might be true but can be equated to a straw man. The American higher education observers don't dwell on warning students on some debts; somewhat, they know the amount of loan obligation for an average student possess which is $27,000, besides this debts hinders many opportunities for young graduates, especially the unstable job market. Furthermore, most of the commentators speculate that the debt burden on students may lead to delaying the recovery of the market for housing, given that graduates from colleges are repaying their loans instead of using their earnings in their homes. However, the debts of students is not a colossal. It is seen to be ever expanding regarding millstone that keeps on dragging back our economy.

Indeed the author of the Myth of the Student Loan Crisis has to reassure all of us that "the economic value of collegeis indisputable" and that "as investments go, college is the best bet around"(Nicole, and Thompson, 2013 p. 32). They should be cognizant enough to give us the picture and sufficient figures that indicate college student contain earnings that are higher and that unemployment rates are lower in graduates of high school. Without those sufficient data, then this statement does not hold true because they lack sufficient evidence that this claim. The statement that is concerned with college student have earnings that are higher and that unemployment rates are lower in graduates of the high school are not only have a correlation confusion that is rounded with causation but also takes responsibility that degrees attained from college will be holding the premium in perpetuity. The statistic that most of the half graduates of the previous year were all under or unemployed after finalizing their college and graduating does not bring any faze them, nor does the figure that is indicated that states almost half of graduates from college hold employment that has no preference for a college education.

Conclusion

Indeed the author of the Myth of the Student Loan Crisis has to reassure all of us that "the economic value of collegeis indisputable" and that "as investments go, college is the best bet around." They should be cognizant enough to give us the picture and sufficient figures that indicate college student contain earnings that are higher and that unemployment rates are lower in graduates of high school. I believe that higher education ought to benefit the larger society and individuals who cohabit in it. Everyone needs to shun away from shouting and diminishing the state which higher education is currently. I have proof that college education investment pays well despite the means one uses to acquire it. Am a believer that despite student debts being deemed as a crisis, we should appreciate that the same debt has led to the creation of a lot of opportunities after they graduate. Thus, the value of college education is economically indisputable. The student loan crisis in higher education is just a myth and not a crisis as Allan and Thompson asserts. The student debt crisis is overblown, and college will always remain a good investment.

 

Reference

NICOLE, ALLAN, and THOMPSON DEREK. "The Myth of The Student-Loan Crisis". Atlantic; vol 311, no. 2, 2013, p. 32.

 

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