Articles Analysis Essay on Hawaiian Culture

Published: 2021-07-16 16:55:03
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George Washington University
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Campbell, Jean. "Na Mo'olelo'Okala: Eerie Stories from Hawaii." (2014).

The author addresses the suppression of the Hawaiian language back in the 1800s which was spearheaded by the Hawaiian league. This comprised mostly of the wealthy Caucasian businessmen. The league started the restriction of the native Hawaiian and all this was taking place during the run of the King Kalakaua. Also, the book manages to cover the opposition of the league by the Kings sister Lili'uokalani. This managed to keep the native Hawaiians in balance. All this was arched due to the king's sister poison which seems to have played out successfully. Later in 1893 the government English as the primary and dominant language. To instil this among the young children in schools the government imposed rules to punish those students who spoke Hawaiian. This was trying to nature a language among the young and make them adapt to the language as they grew. The also in the process associated the process of knowing English as being educated hence acted as a motivation for the students hence them gaining more interest in the language. The educative factor also affected the parents of these children by reducing the level at which they interacted with their children in Hawaiian but used English since it was associated with educative. All these different approaches lead to less time for the students to learn the Hawaiian language among them.

Gregg, Toni Makani, et al. "Puka mai he ko a: The significance of corals in Hawaiian culture." Ethnobiology of Corals and Coral Reefs. Springer International Publishing, 2015. 103-115.

Hawaiian started becoming extinct due to several reasons and this paper has covered the core reason as to why the language almost faded off the American community. When Hawaii was annexed as a territory of the United State English became the common language due to how Hawaii was treated. It was treated as a second generation among the other states in the United States hence for them to fit in they had to start learning English and learning it fast so as to belong. This was during the National Act of 1940 where the immigrants into the United States were expected to speak English so as to get their citizenship in the country. Also the decrease in cultural ties where people Hawaiians started interacting with the other people forming new cultural ties lead to the close extinction of the language.

Lyon, Jeffrey. "No ka Baibala Hemolele: The Making of the Hawaiian Bible." (2017).

The author focuses on the ability of the human brain to understand a new language and use it effectively depends on the level of understanding of the language, how often the person familiarises with the language and uses it. Religion has been one of the things used in different countries but for example, the Christians have a bible in so many languages hence making it possible for Christians from all over the world to understand it. This has been a platform for many to get to learn other languages hence the focus on this by the author. Hawaiian being used to write the Bible has been a significant step in growing the language basically so as to expose the language out there to the entire world. This also gives the fluent language speakers a chance to show that the Hawaiian language is as standard as the other languages and it is not inefficient as the notion which is thought by many.

Lyon, Jeffrey. "Palapala, a journal for Hawaiian language and literature." (2017).

The author introduces the value of the language in his book and addresses the richness in uniqueness and tradition of the language. The language is fluently spoken by merely 10,000 people but still, makes it retain its value. The author also has covered a brief introduction to the history of the language as to where it originated. The language happens to be passed down orally from generation to generation as per the author of the book through Hula which in English means the traditional Polynesian dance, the language becomes more unique as it consists of only twelve letters five vowels and the consonants H K L M N P and finally W. those are the only letters that form the unique mellifluous sound which happens to act as the trade mark of the sound. The author also makes major efforts in analysing the language as well as the few words and how different the language is from other languages such as French and also Spanish. Both of these languages consist of more than 50000 words while they do not have the uniqueness experienced in this other language.

Young, Kanalu G. Terry. Rethinking the native Hawaiian past. Routledge, 2014.

The Hawaiian language almost died off during the American colonial time but this change in the 1970s due to the formation of the Aha Punana Leo. The Author covers the extension of the language and some of the main reasons that led to this. Also, this looks at the resurfacing of the language in the 1970s and the efforts associated with the resurfacing of the language. There Punana Leo utilised a number of different methods which later on would start being recognized as the Hawaiian Model. These models are currently being utilized on the mainland and different schooling systems so as to aid the survival of the North Americans indigenous language. As per the author, the language is considered unique due to the small number of people who happen to speak it fluently as compared to the other languages around the world. The author mainly focuses on the resurrection of the language after the American colonization which almost made the language extinct.

Work Cited

Campbell, Jean. "Na Mo'olelo'Okala: Eerie Stories from Hawaii." (2014).

Gregg, Toni Makani, et al. "Puka mai he ko a: The significance of corals in Hawaiian culture." Ethnobiology of Corals and Coral Reefs. Springer International Publishing, 2015. 103-115.

Lyon, Jeffrey. "No ka Baibala Hemolele: The Making of the Hawaiian Bible." (2017).

Lyon, Jeffrey. "Palapala, a journal for Hawaiian language and literature." (2017).

Young, Kanalu G. Terry. Rethinking the native Hawaiian past. Routledge, 2014.

 

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